UPCOMING SHOWS



 
 Heaters
Cowgirl + Glass Traps
The Fulford Arms, York
Wednesday 24th May, 7.30pm

Less than a year after the release of “Holy Water Pool” – Heaters’ debut, a crushing, revelatory psycho-surf-rock anointment-as-album – there are no apparent signs of distress to the engine that powers this Michigan-made vehicle of sound. To the contrary, Heaters are operating at a higher horsepower than ever before, as evidenced by the 2016 release of “Baptistina.”

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“Baptistina” glimmers to a greater degree than anything Heaters have previously unleashed, a full-spectrum sheen that shines across the full panorama of righteous reverb riots. Heaters are in full control of their machine from the opening, looped-lunacy of “Centennial” to the final crash of “Seafoam,” forty-six minutes later – and yet the result of this increase in control can be heard as a willingness to crash their ship completely. But have faith in the pilots – Heaters are living for the next ride.

“Centennial” rides the wave effortlessly, setting the tone for the album in full, hovering in the atmosphere above strutting, Bolan-blasts of riff-rock-lift-off perfection before letting the edges drift and blur, exploring the gravitational pull of less solid ground. Taking the first three songs of “Baptistina” – “Centennial,” “Ara Pacis” and “Orbs” – together is to take the sacrament of a singing, searing psych-rock sinfonia, an expertly-constructed breed of amplified surrealism, framed by the tight corners and unmistakable electric glory of what was once known as rock and roll. It doesn’t matter thatHeaters are not trying to answer the musical question, “What if Grand Funk Railroad got really into Flying Saucer Attack?”; what matters is that the answer is there for the taking.

The album’s centerpiece may very well be “Garden Eater,” a perfectly prepared prescription of the relentless sonic schizophrenia in which Heaters deal so effectively. At nearly eight and a half minutes, it’s about twice as long as anything that appeared on “Holy Water Pool,” giving ample room for the band to spread their sound into broad, bold new dimensions – hypnotic, Hawkwind-hued chanting harmonies, anyone? – without ever detaching from the very root of their sound. It’s perhaps no surprise that the following track, playfully named “Dali,” would be a throbbing reminder of the persistence of memory, given its Silver Apples-esque flavor precedes the perfectly placed flower-power-pop of “Mango.”

The final three tracks of “Baptistina” recall the superb symmetry of the album’s opening trio, an undeniable triptych of pace, power and persona, garage-rock gurus emerging from thin air, spent snares and a dramatic lack of cares. On “Baptistina,” Heaters don’t sound weirder than before – they simply are.


Tickets for this show are £7 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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The Monochrome Set
St. Christopher + Refuel
The Crescent, York
Saturday 27th May, 7.30pm

Featuring original members Bid (Guitar/Vocals) and Andy Warren (bass) with John Paul Moran (keyboards) and Mike Urban, who was previously in the band in the early 90s, on drums, The Monochrome Set formed in 1978 and were heavily influential in the 'post-punk' scene that evolved after the initial scorched earth of punk. 

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The band's early releases were on the legendary Rough Trade Label before signing with Virgin offshoot Din Disc. They also released several albums on the Cherry Red label, making a notable appearance on that labels' well known 'Pillows and Prayers' compilation.

Though The Monochrome Set split in 1985 the next decade saw several reunions for both live gigs and further studio recordings, their album release count now being well into double figures.

After a hiatus of over a decade the band reformed full time in 2010 and have since toured all over the UK, Europe, Japan and the USA, whilst also releasing four new, critically acclaimed, studio albums, the most recent, 'Cosmonaut', on the German 'Tapete' label in September 2016.


Tickets for this show are £12 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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Bill Ryder-Jones
Westerman
'Intimate Venue Acoustic Tour'
The Crescent, York
Tuesday 6th June, 7.30pm

More info to follow.

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Tickets for this show are £10 in advance.

You can get tickets in person from the venue and The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.
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 The Bats
Brudenell Social Club, Leeds
Wednesday 14th June, 7.30pm

What an absolute privileged it is to welcome Flying Nun mainstays The Bats to Leeds in June. Last seen in Europe in 2012 (I think!) when they were bloody great at Primavera, they have a brand new record in the works 'The Deep Set'.

 Teaming up with the good people at the Brudenell. Probably won't happen again.

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Five years after the release of their last critically acclaimed album, The Bats return with album number nine, “The Deep Set”. With the title conveying the long established and firmly embedded, it’s notable that it’s thirty years since The Bats began recording their debut album, Daddy’s Highway, in the living room studio of a friend of a friend in Glasgow. This time around they recorded in The Sitting Room, the studio-sleep out-garage next to Ben Edward’s house in Lyttelton, following in the footsteps of Marlon Williams, Nadia Reid and many others.

With Edwards help “The Deep Set” continues The Bats’ 21st century resurgence. Yes, this is The Bats so the chords still chug, the guitars chime, ring, and jangle, the melodies are clear and memorable, the rhythm section is unstoppable. But the band mines the darker, deeper sound that 2011’s “Free All the Monsters” revealed.

The songs remain reflective but that oft-expected sweet folksiness pops up less frequently. As the title suggests the music is richer, expansive, deeper. In their fourth decade as a band familiarity has come to mean a more careful treatment of each song. Is it maturity? It definitely translates into more depth and complexity but hey the songs are still as catchy as all hell. And as a lyricist, Robert Scott continues his mastery of the personal and pastoral, the landscape and longing.

As always the key to The Bats is the emotion that their (seemingly) simple songs carry. They continue to mine that Mainland melancholy; the kind that somehow never risks being depressing. But of course that means there is lament and nostalgia, even if it’s only for last night.

Taking us from the sunshine of Otago’s Taieri River to darkest Durkestan and apparently ending in the midst of contemporary New Zealand politics, “The Deep Set” continues the composed confidence of their recent albums with one of The Bats’strongest sets of songs, fueled by ever-more powerful guitars. If you grew up with The Bats their early recordings will always pull at your emotions but while less vulnerable and immediate than on their classic debut album, The Bats of the 21st century somehow manage to be more intimate and urgent.


Tickets for this show are £15 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Crash Records and Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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The Peacers
Wolf Solent + Bad Paintings DJs
The Fulford Arms, York

Sunday 18th June, 7.30pm

We're very pleased to be welcoming back former Sic Alps frontman Mike Donovan to York after they played awesome shows here in 2009 and 2011. Mike has an all-star new band and a brand new album coming on Drag City Records. More info below.


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Escalating from a disembodied voice to slowly mounting full-band hypnosis, The Peacers is a trip into the goldenrod days of fandom, a dimension where a t-shirt could change your life. Since their first LP in the summer 2015, The Peacers have been gigging in SF and around, collecting tunes for this divinely awaited moment: Introducing the Crimsmen. Lurching back into life, with buzz and hum alight and colors flashing, is the name, but the instigators of the sound are almost a whole other bunch. Sic Alps main-man Mike Donovan, Shayde Sartin (Ty Segall, The Fresh & Onlys, Kelley Stoltz etc), Mike Shoun (Thee Oh Sees) and Bo Moore (Bozmo)! Which is good - who do you trust with a treat to jam in your ears more than new/old friends capable of tapping good old sounds?

Nobody but The Peacers, that's who.

The Peacers got a hand into a variety of rock and roll baked goods, Whether gentle psych, basement throb, keening "Time of the Season" nocturne or ground-glass soundscape, it's all bubblegum boiled in a pot, scripted up with stinging street smart, zoloftnagenic reverie and a wink and a chill grin. Sing along to the shimmer of the first single, "Jurgen's Layout"---which finds hidden time and bits of things they brought in from other places that are all set in a relaxed array that only The Peacers are inclined to offer you! Listen to "Jurgen's Layout" right about now.


 Tickets for this show are £7 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Crash Records and Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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Justin Townes Earle
The Crescent, York
Monday 3rd July, 7.30pm

Since launching his recording career a decade ago, Justin Townes Earle has established a reputation as a singular leading light in the Americana music community.  With fearless, personally charged lyrical insight and infectious melodic craftsmanship, the young veteran singer-songwriter has built a rich, personally charged body of work.

Now, on his seventh album (and New West debut) Kids in the Street, Justin Townes Earle raises the creative and personal stakes to deliver a deeply soulful set that's both emotionally riveting and effortlessly uplifting.  Taking himself out of his creative comfort zone and assembling a new set of collaborators, Earle has created one of his most potent efforts to date, reflecting all manner of new influences upon his life and his art.

"Life has changed a lot for me in the last few years," Earle reflects.  "I got married and am getting ready to become a father, and this is the first record that I've written since I've been married.  There's definitely an uplifting aspect to this record in a lot of ways, because I'm feeling pretty positive.

"When I wrote songs in the past," he continues, "I was looking in on what I was feeling, but this record's more about looking outward on what's happening, and writing about subjects like gentrification and inner city strife.  This record also has more of a soul influence to it, and it's got a deeper connection to the blues than anything I've done before."

Earle's current level of inspiration is apparent throughout Kids in the Street, on which such tunes as "Champagne Corolla," "Maybe A Moment," "Faded Valentine" and the haunting title track paint vivid, vital portraits of characters at the mercy of forces beyond their control.  Elsewhere, Earle's personalized update of the trad blues number "Stagalee" recasts that outlaw classic in modern terms, and his reading of Paul Simon's "Graceland" (included here as a bonus track) locates the gospel/blues number that's always been at the song's heart.

Several of Kids in the Street's songs reference the lower-middle-class Nashville neighborhoods of Earle's youth, which in recent years have lost their character to the creeping scourge of gentrification.

"Nashville has really changed for the worse, and it's not the same place it was," Earle notes.  "The song 'Kids in the Street' is about that, and uses the names of streets in the neighborhood I grew up in.  So does 'Stagalee.'  My mom left the neighborhood long ago because of gentrification.  And where she lives now is now the new site of gentrification; her property taxes have gone up to where she can't afford.  I don't know where the hell she'll move to next, because there's no more working-class neighborhoods in Nashville."

Kids in the Street is, significantly, the first Justin Townes Earle album not recorded in Nashville.  Instead, he cut the songs at TK in Omaha, Nebraska with producer Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes, Rilo Kiley), who helps to lend the album a distinctive sonic sensibility that's well suited to the songs' lyrical immediacy, and which brings out the best in Earle's heartfelt performances.

"It's the first time that I've worked outside of my usual umbrella of people to make a record," Earle explains, adding, "In Nashville, if you have the right connections, it'll spoil the shit out of you, because you've got access to the best musicians in the world and the best studios in the world.  If you had told me when I started making records, that I wasn't gonna make every record in Nashville, I would have told you you were crazy.  And if you'd told me that I'd end up making a record in Omaha, I'd tell you you were out of your freaking mind.

"I brought Paul Niehaus, who's been my guitar and steel player for about seven years, with me, but otherwise I used all local players," Earle says of the Kids in the Street sessions.  "There was a part of me that was not completely comfortable with using musicians I'd never heard of, but overall it was a positive thing to get out of my comfort zone.  Normally I like to stick with my people; I've had the same engineer on every record, and the same photographer for every publicity picture.  So it was a bit of a challenge to put my trust in someone who captures sound in a different way.  But it worked out really well.

"Mike has a great sensibility about him, and there's something really serious about the way he does it, but at the same time there's a lightheartedness in the way that he crafts music.  It required some sitting back on my part, which took some effort, but it turned out to be great.  We did all of the vocals and basic tracks live, which almost nobody does these days, but that's the way I like to work because it keeps it organic."
Mogis echoes Earle's sentiments. "I really didn't know what to expect heading into the session with Justin," he says. "I had heard that he could be a little difficult and unpredictable, but what I found was just the opposite.  He kept the mood light, and always had something witty to say.  He was curious and open to almost any suggestion.  The band gelled quickly with him, so that led to a relaxed creative environment.  The process of making this record was a lot of fun, and it was refreshing to work with an artist who wants to get the performance right.  Neither Justin nor the band did a single punch or overdub.  Justin is a guy who is deeply passionate and knowledgeable about music and its lineage, and his brain is like a musical encyclopedia.  I learned a good deal of music history from him.”

Kids in the Street's songs are the product of an extended break from recording, during which Earle spent time living in New York City and northern California, before moving to his current home base of Portland, Oregon.

"It ended up taking a lot longer than I thought it would," he says.  "About halfway through that, I decided to just go with it and to believe that's just what these songs needed.  It was definitely more of an intensive writing process, getting everything just how I wanted it to be.  For the last year of that process, I was living in northern Mendocino County, right on the water, and there's nothing to do around there but write.  So I had the time to take to do that.  But after a year there, it was a little too slow, so Portland here we come."

Earle's fierce fidelity to his creative muse has been a consistent thread throughout his young life.  Born in Nashville on January 4, 1982, he grew up as the son of country-rock iconoclast Steve Earle, who gave him his middle name in honor of the great Texas songwriter Townes Van Zandt.
Justin quickly came into his own as a songwriter and performer, displaying a natural talent for deeply revealing lyrics that reflected his often-harsh life experiences, and a musical approach that effortlessly integrated elements of blues, folk and country.  His 2007 debut EP Yuma set the stage for a steady stream of acclaimed albums: The Good Life (2008), Midnight at the Movies (2009), Harlem River Blues (2010)), Nothing's Going to Change the Way You Feel About Me Now (2012), Single Mothers (2014) and Absent Fathers (2015).  In the process, he built a large and devoted fan base that continues to support his work.

Now embracing marriage, sobriety and impending fatherhood, Justin Townes Earle is enthusiastically looking to the future.  "I can't say if I'm getting better, but I'm definitely evolving as a songwriter," he states.  "That's my goal, to soak up new things and be aware of seeing life from a different point of view.  The only thing I hope is that, in some shape, form or fashion, each record I make is better than the one before."


Tickets for this show are £15 in advance.

You can get tickets in person from the venue and The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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The Gories
Brudenell Social Club, Leeds
Wednesday 12th July, 7.30pm

'The best garage band in America since the '60s. Very primitive…they made people with Les Pauls and Marshall amps look like idiots.'
Jack White

Website / Watch / Listen


The Gories began in the cultural vacuum of Detroit in 1986. With humble beginnings at a community concert series through a tumultuous end on their 1992 European tour, this is a band whose influence has far outstretched the ground they covered. Rooted in the primal, primitive underpinnings of 50's rhythm and blues and unhinged 60s garage punk, the sound they came to was wholly their own. While band members Mick Collins and Dan Kroha would go on to wider recognition in the Dirtbombs and Demolition Dolls Rods respectively, the Gories should be viewed in the same influential context as the Velvet Underground and the Cramps. While they may have barely sold any records, the folks that saw and heard these bands were inspired to create. It's high time the Gories get their due.

Tickets for this show are £15 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Crash Records and Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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 Sam Outlaw
(full band)
Night & Day Cafe, Manchester

Thursday 27th July, 7.30pm

Having spent much of 2016 on tour with his good buddy Margo Price, now is Sam's time to shine with the release of his brand new Ry-Cooder-produced album 'Tenderheart'.


Website / Watch / Watch 

“There’s a tender heart beating for you…”
Cynicism comes easy, but having a soft heart takes real guts. Sam Outlaw’s new album Tenderheart dares to tread gently and look inward, with unapologetic sentiment and un-ironic nods to country music’s greatest neon rainbow chasers.

Since the release of his 2015 debut Angeleno, Outlaw remains one of LA’s only modern country singers to earn international acclaim. And with his follow-up Tenderheart he shows an impressive refinement of his artistic identity. Sonically, the album further elaborates Outlaw’s “SoCal Country” sound: a sun-bleached, Baja-influenced twang that deftly points to country’s neo-traditionalists and LA’s legendary singer-songwriters. Thematically Tenderheart is a thesis on self-discovery and the power of love – a course set with the opening chords of “Everyone’s Looking For Home.” The opening track is a cinematic, mariachi-laced meditation on Outlaw’s own conflicted quest for peace amongst the chaos of his chosen path.

Along the way he also takes a look around, and Tenderheart’s revelations are most potent when filtered through Outlaw’s distinctive Los Angeles vantage point. “Bottomless Mimosas” is emotionally hollowing in its portrayal of west coast existentialism while “Bougainvillea, I Think” and “Dry In The Sun” round out this trio of ‘Los Angeles songs’ that explore the city’s faded beauty and define “SoCal Country” beyond instrumentation.

“Trouble,” one of the album’s standouts, makes being bad sound pretty damn good with determined ‘Side A’ swagger and kicks off a song cycle that chronicles a heart’s bend, break and mend. “She’s Playing Hard To Get (Rid Of)” showcases acerbic wit in teary three-four time, setting the scene for “Two Broken Hearts” – a wounded lovers’ getaway story with an open ending. Over the course of these thirteen songs it becomes increasingly apparent why his clever intertwining of country tropes and crisp modernism has so impressed country music fans, critics and songwriters alike. (Alt-country pioneer Ryan Adams just recently praised Outlaw, calling his work “beyond great songwriting”.)

Angeleno’s critical acclaim also led to 18 months of international touring. He entertained thousands of festival-goers with a prime slot at Stagecoach, made four trips to Europe, toured Australia twice and played several hundred gigs in the USA. After all those miles it’s fitting that Tenderheart bottles the energy of the songs that have become mainstays of his live show. Fan-favorites like “Diamond Ring” and honky-tonk sing-along “All My Life” finally get proper studio treatment, along with “Look At You Now,” a regular highlight of his acoustic tours overseas – where Outlaw is nominated for AmericanaUK’s International Album of the Year alongside Sturgill Simpson and Margo Price.

Not one to mess with a winning combination, Sam called on many of the same musicians that made Angeleno such a success: harmony singer Molly Jenson, pedal steel pro Jeremy Long and guitarist Danny Garcia, along with Taylor Goldsmith (Dawes) and Bo Koster (My Morning Jacket). Produced by Martin Pradler and Outlaw and recorded in the San Fernando Valley, Tenderheart also features Erwin Vasquez and Mariachi Teocuitatlan, a local mariachi group who appeared in the video for Angeleno’s title track.

Now two years into his new life, Outlaw has learned that great dreams can only be achieved at great cost. And at its core, Tenderheart is the outcome of another lesson learned: if your heart stays true, the sacrifice is worth it.

'Angeleno made him a legitimate contender to be the biggest country star L.A. has produced since Dwight Yoakam.'
LA Weekly

'Sam Outlaw is rewriting the sound of Country, 2,000 miles from Nashville'
CBS This Morning

'An instant classic'
NPR Music

'[Outlaw is] leading the rebirth of L.A.’s modern country scene.'
Rolling Stone Country


 Tickets for this show are £12.50 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from Piccadilly Records in Manchester or online from here.

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 Hurray For the Riff Raff
 The Crescent, York
Tuesday 15th August, 7.30pm

 We've been trying to tempt them for a couple of years so we're very pleased to welcome Hurray For The Riff Raff to York for the first time. After near universal praise for the recent album 'The Navigator', tickets for this show will probably fly out so grab one quick if you want in.

'Her boozy, morning-after croon is still gorgeous, but now there’s elements of Puerto Rican bomba and salsa, son cubano, doo-wop, and even the spoken-word poetry of the Nuyorican Poets Cafe she haunted as a teen. Her band has gone through a variety of lineups, but this one feels like a clean slate.'
8.1 - Pitchfork

'The Navigator might be full of site-specific anger and yearning, but like its predecessors, it is incredibly easy on the ear. The songs just flow--slinky, sad or elegant in their own ways.'
5/5 - The Observer

Website / Watch / Listen

Full bio:

It had been a successful, if tumultuous, ride for Alynda Segarra, who’s been spreading a new kind of roots-conscious folk music across the country from her adopted hometown of New Orleans. But as far as the Bronx native had come with her band, Hurray for the Riff Raff, there was still a missing link to her story.  “The more I toured, ending up in the middle of nowhere bars from Texas to Tennessee,” said Segarra, “I just started feeling more and more like, I don’t belong here, I gotta get back to my people, you know?”

After many years in New Orleans, Segarra found herself getting antsy. Hurray for the Riff Raff had four albums under its belt, with the last one, Small Town Heroes, featuring “The Body Electric,” a song that NPR’s Ann Powers called “The Political Song of the Year” in 2014. Yet even though her musical career had begun by running away from home at 17, busking for survival and honing her craft through dreams of Bessie Smith, Ma Rainey, Memphis Minnie, and Woody Guthrie, Segarra realized she is a Puerto Rican kid from the Bronx with a different story to tell.

To find her way back home, Segarra became the willing vessel for a character she calls “The Navigator,” from which her new album takes its name. She describes The Navigator, a/k/a Navita Milagros Negrón, as “this girl who grows up in a city that’s like New York, who’s a street kid, like me when I was little, that has a special place in the history of her people.” Through The Navigator, the listener hears an ambitiously interwoven, cinematic story of a wandering soul that finally realized she needed to connect with and honor her ancestors.

Segarra quickly went to work with producer Paul Butler, whose work with British soul singer Michael Kiwanuka she deeply admired, to capture the cinematic, old but new quality she wanted. It also meant assembling a core group of percussionists like Kansas City-based Juan-Carlos Chaurand and Devendra Banhart's drummer Gregory Rogove to play everything from Cuban to Puerto Rican to Brazilian backing beats. The result is an interconnected set of introspective songs, grounded in Segarra’s eclectic rustic root style, yet adorned by elements of son montuno, plena, and a kind of Mink De Ville retro-doowop rock.

Segarra drew early inspiration from cult favorite Rodriguez, a Mexican-American who translated working-class stories from Detroit into powerful rock ballads, and the Ghetto Brothers, an underground band from the 1970s South Bronx who stitched Puerto Rican nationalist messages into a rough-hewn fabric of Santana and Sly and the Family Stone Afro-Caribbean funk. She reached back to her cultural ancestors in the form of the radical political group the Young Lords and the salsa singer Héctor Lavoe. “I would just try to have the rhythm in my head and write the lyrics,” said Segarra. “Then I went back and added everything else, it was like poetry?”

Poetry permeates The Navigator, like when Segarra juxtaposes the feeling of growing up in a box in the sky on the 14th floor of an apartment building with the feeling her father had flying for what seemed like an eternity in a propeller plane from Puerto Rico to New York in the song “14th Floor.” Or when, in the elegiac piano-driven ballad “Pa’lante,” named after the Young Lords newspaper that showed the way forward, she inserts the sampled voice of legendary poet Pedro Pietri reading from his seminal opus “The Puerto Rican Obituary.” The Navigator is a restless observer, perched at the nexus of Allen Ginsberg’s East Village and the Nuyorican Poets Café, confessing the blues and dancing the punky salsa steps of a lonely girl, a hungry ghost.

Like a song-cycle from an imaginary Off-Broadway musical, The Navigator rises from the ashes of loneliness and striving, honky tonks and long walks by the river of urban dreams. From the wistful melancholy of “Life to Save,” to the stubborn resignation of “Nothing’s Gonna Change That Girl,” Segarra’s voice speaks with a husky weariness that coexists with a naïve curiosity. It’s the voice of a rebel who wanted everyone to think she was so tough, and nobody could take her down, but at the same time was yearning for love and magic, some kind of an awakening.Long-time Riff Raff fans should feel at home in The Navigator’s World. There’s always been a little bit of syncopated Caribbean strut to down home rock and roll, Appalachian rags share a similar root with Spanish troubadours and the blues is the same in any language. On The Navigator, Segarra’s voice has never been more soulful, whether she’s decrying urban gentrification on “Rican Beach” or mourning the lies people tell on “Halfway There.” Like the moment we’re living in, The Navigator is as much about the past as it is the future.

With its 12 tracks and its Travelers, Sages, and Sirens, The Navigator comes straight at you from the intersection of apocalypse and hope. This album rides Patti Smith’s high horse while straddling a thin line between love and hate. Segarra may lament the Trumpsters who want to “build a wall and keep them out,” but she knows that, like the outcasts she embraces, “Any day now/I will come along.” There’ll be no more hiding at the dimly lit intersections of class, race, and sexual identity—now we will all come into the light.

“I feel like my generation, through groups like Black Lives Matter, is really focusing on that type of intersectionality—if one of us is not free, then none of us are free,” said Segarra. “The Navigator’s role is to tell the story, tell it to the people who don’t know their own story, so they can be free.”


Tickets for this show are £13 in advance.

You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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Kark Blau
Laura Gibson
The Crescent, York
Saturday 19th August, 8pm

Well this gig took a turn for the better! Now a co-headline show with Karl and his band joining the fun. This will now take place at the Crescent in York.

Karl Blau

Karl Blau is a multi-instrumentalist, singer, and DIY icon who helped turn his hometown of Anacortes, Washington, into an indie-music mecca.  He has released more than 40 records in 20-odd years, many self-released in handmade packaging and mailed to subscribers, and others on iconic indie Northwest labels K and knw-yr-own.  Blau has also toured and recorded for years with Laura Veirs, the Microphones, Little Wings, D+, and Earth.

On 'Introducing Karl Blau' the enigmatic vocalist charts a new vision of country music.  A Northwest indie hero, Blau channels darkness and hope in a cinematic collection of Nashville country hits from the 1960’s and 70’s. Produced by Tucker Martine, the record features performances by Jim James (My Morning Jacket), Laura Veirs, Jon Hyde, Eli Moore (Lake), Steve Moore (Earth, SunnO)))), among others.

It all started with cutting a 7” single, a cover of the 1969 Tom T. Hall hit “That’s How I Got to Memphis”.  Blau, whom Martine had come to know from sessions with Laura Veirs among others, asked if he could try singing it.  “I knew what a special artist Karl was, but I had no idea what a powerful interpreter of songs he was,’ Martine says.  The collaboration, pairing Blau’s deeply sonorous voice with Martine’s warm, modern arrangements, recast the Nashville hit in a new light.

The record, all covers, is a crate-digger’s feast of forgotten hits and deeper cuts; most of them from the Nashville country-soul renaissance in the late 1960s and early 70s – Tom T. Hall, Bobby Bond, Allen Reynolds. Other songs are from the Bee Gees (To Love Somebody), Link Wray (Fallin’ Rain), or Townes Van Zandt (If I Needed You).  The project was a labor of love for Martine, the son of a Nashville songwriter who grew up listening to many of these songs.

Tucker Martine, known for his distinctive production work on music by My Morning Jacket, the Decemberists, and Laura Veirs, was first introduced to Blau’s early music by Veirs. “I was transfixed by Karl’s voice and completely absorbed by the world of sound he had created.  I felt like I had been shown one of the great hidden treasures of music.”

'It shimmers with an enchanting beauty that this writer at least has yet to find in any other song this year.'
The 405

'A dark and glorious vision, reinterpreting Nashville country-soul hits from the '60s and '70s.'
**** Mojo Magazine

'The songs are rendered sincerely, with elegant, understated phrasing.'
**** Uncut Magazine

Laura Gibson


Both literary and raw, with a love of a traditional folk music and a bent towards experimentation, multi-instrumentalist/singer-songwriter Laura Gibson has toured four continents, and is a frequent collaborator. She just recently received an MFA in Fiction Writing from Hunter College, while working on her forth release, the wise and vulnerable "Empire Builder", which Pitchfork called her best record to date.  Laura recently collaborated with French artist The Avener on the single “You Belong”, featured in a worldwide ad campaign for Zadig & Voltaire.
 
Website / Watch / Listen


'Her best record to date...Gibson offers a cathartic tale of loss and redemption, set against a gorgeous sonic backdrop. She sounds newly confident, invigorated, and free.'
Pitchfork

'Captivating.'
**** Mojo

'There isn’t a song here that isn’t a low-key delight.'
**** Q

'A triumph'
8/10, Uncut


Tickets for this show are £9 in advance.

You can get tickets in person from the venue and The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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 BMX Bandits
Jasmine Minks
The Crescent, York
Sunday 20th August, 7.30pm

We're welcoming Scottish indie legends BMX Bandits to York in August. They've a new record in 2017 and so far it sounds totally great. As an added bonus newly reformed Aberdeen five-piece Jasmine Minks are in support.

Website / Watch / Listen 

BMX Bandits

 'If I could be in any other band, it would be BMX Bandits.'
Kurt Cobain

'Britain’s ultimate cult group'
The Guardian

BMX Bandits were formed in the ex-industrial town of Bellshill by songwriter and lead vocalist  Duglas T Stewart out of the ashes of The Pretty Flowers, a group that featured Stewart alongside Frances McKee (The Vaselines), Sean Dickson (The Soup Dragons) and Norman Blake (Teenage Fanclub).

BMX Bandits' songs mix melodic qualities and humour with, at times, raw and heartbreaking pathos. Duglas describes their songs as being his world put to music.
Starting with the exuberant 'E102' in 1986 BMX Bandits released a series of singles on Stephen's Pastels' 53rd & 3rd label, where they were label mates with The Vaselines and Beat Happening. Later they joined Creation Records, home of Teenage Fanclub, My Bloody Valentine, Primal Scream and many others. The group's most celebrated song is the autobiographical 'Serious Drugs', recorded in 1991 but not released until 1993.  Oasis did their first UK tour dates supporting the Bandits as a favour to Creation label boss Alan McGee.

Stewart split with his long term musical partner Francis Macdonald in 2005 but 2006 saw a new wave of concert activity and the release of My Chain. Stewart's writing on the album was compared to Brian Wilson, Michel Legrand, Ennio Morricone and even Alan Bennet. The line up was expanded by the arrival of Stewart's friend David Scott and new female vocalist Rachel Allison. The follow-up, 2007's Bee Stings, was influenced by classic girl group pop plus the mellow A & M sound of the late 1960s and early '70s.

 A highly acclaimed feature-length documentary called Serious Drugs - Duglas and the Music of BMX Bandits was premiered in Glasgow in 2011, followed by a series of international festival screenings and an international DVD release.  The film featured in Sight & Sound's top films of the year list. The band released the album BMX Bandits In Space in 2012 on Elefant Records. In Space has been hailed as their most accomplished release so far, “a stunning, brilliant and beautiful album”.
 

The group have completed recording their forthcoming album BMX Bandits Forever, due for release on 19th of May 2017 on Elefant Records. BMX Bandits Forever is BMX Bandits darkest album so far but ultimately it's still an album full of love and hope.

The album features the band's newest member, multi-instrumentalist and singer Chloe Philip. Chloe brings an extra exuberance to BMX Bandits live shows and is the perfect partner in crime for chief Bandito Duglas and his muse. Duglas' main collaborator on Forever is Stuart Kidd who first joined the band in 2002. As well as being a key member of the BMX Bandits musical family Stuart has contributed to recent releases by many other artists including Euros Childs, Norman Blake, Gulp, The Wellgreen, Snowgoose, The Pearlfishers and many more. Forever also features a brand new collaboration between Duglas and Brian Jonestown Massacre leader Anton Newcombe.

The line-up of the group continues to be ever changing but the heart and soul of the group remains the same, an extended musical family led by the inimitable Duglas.


Jasmine Minks

Aberdeen indie five-piece Jasmine Minks were long time artists for Alan McGee’s Creation and Poptones labels, releasing a number of singles and albums over the years.

This song is for family loved ones now gone but never forgotten, and particularly for Wattie’s brother and band friend (Phil Duncan) who is currently fighting Motor Neurone Disease (MND). All monies (and we mean every penny) will go to Scottish MND. Phil is focused on fundraising for MND and this is one initiative that aims to do just that. Any airplay would be terrific and a real boost! MND is such a cruel disease. We send you this song for you to have a listen. If you could play it on radio then we’d be eternally grateful. Every single play matters. Phil cycled for Scotland and competed against many top riders (Tour de France guys such as Robert Millar, Malcolm Elliott, Allan Peiper etc) so it's hurtful seeing such a fit guy struck down.

We hope you like the song and can give it airtime and get awareness of MND out there at the same time.


Website / Listen

Tickets for this show are £15 in advance.

You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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GospelbeacH
Miranda Lee Richards
(full band)

The Crescent, York
Saturday 26th August, 7.30pm

The Castle, Manchester
Sunday 27th August, 7.30pm 
 
GospelbeacH

Brent Rademaker of furtherBeachwood Sparks and The Tyde brings his new band GospelbeacH over the UK for the 1st time this summer. The touring band also features ex-Slowdive and Mojave 3 drummer Ian McCutcheon.

GospelbeacH play dreamy American roots music and their new album Another Summer Of Love is released June 16th on Alive Naturalsound.

On Another Summer Of Love, like Gram Parsons, Rademaker has drawn nourishment from the openness of Southern California and the sunny, hopeful feeling that epitomises his work is in full effect here. From the kick-off 'In The Desert', which slyly references The Jam to the jaunty swing of 'You’re Already Home' which pays a subtle tribute to Rademaker’s hero Chris Hillman’s 'Girl With No Name', this is what Americana is supposed to be and sometimes is not. Smart, informed, soulful, well-executed and avoiding the slick assembly-line of 2017 Nashville, this is the kind of record that true fans of well-crafted tuneful rock live for.  


Website / Watch
 

Miranda Lee Richards

Los Angeles-based singer-songwriter Miranda Lee Richards started her musical career when she became friends with Kirk Hammet from Metallica, who taught her to play guitar. Early demos of her songs reached the ears of Anton Newcombe, and she joined his band The Brian Jonestown Massacre. She sang on their albums Give It Back, Bringing It All Back Home Again, and Stung Out In Heaven, and appeared with them in the seminal documentary DIG!.

Her music a mix of folk, psychedelia, country and indie pop and her new album Existential Beast is released June 16th on Invisible Hands Music.


Website / Watch 

Tickets for this show are £8 in advance.

You can get York tickets in person from the venue, The Inkwell, Jumbo Records and online from here.

Manchester tickets are available from here.

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 Sam Outlaw Band
Brudenell Social Club, Leeds

Sunday 27th August, 7.30pm

Having spent much of 2016 on tour with his good buddy Margo Price, now is Sam's time to shine with the release of his brand new Ry-Cooder-produced album 'Tenderheart'.


Website / Watch / Watch 

“There’s a tender heart beating for you…”
Cynicism comes easy, but having a soft heart takes real guts. Sam Outlaw’s new album Tenderheart dares to tread gently and look inward, with unapologetic sentiment and un-ironic nods to country music’s greatest neon rainbow chasers.

Since the release of his 2015 debut Angeleno, Outlaw remains one of LA’s only modern country singers to earn international acclaim. And with his follow-up Tenderheart he shows an impressive refinement of his artistic identity. Sonically, the album further elaborates Outlaw’s “SoCal Country” sound: a sun-bleached, Baja-influenced twang that deftly points to country’s neo-traditionalists and LA’s legendary singer-songwriters. Thematically Tenderheart is a thesis on self-discovery and the power of love – a course set with the opening chords of “Everyone’s Looking For Home.” The opening track is a cinematic, mariachi-laced meditation on Outlaw’s own conflicted quest for peace amongst the chaos of his chosen path.

Along the way he also takes a look around, and Tenderheart’s revelations are most potent when filtered through Outlaw’s distinctive Los Angeles vantage point. “Bottomless Mimosas” is emotionally hollowing in its portrayal of west coast existentialism while “Bougainvillea, I Think” and “Dry In The Sun” round out this trio of ‘Los Angeles songs’ that explore the city’s faded beauty and define “SoCal Country” beyond instrumentation.

“Trouble,” one of the album’s standouts, makes being bad sound pretty damn good with determined ‘Side A’ swagger and kicks off a song cycle that chronicles a heart’s bend, break and mend. “She’s Playing Hard To Get (Rid Of)” showcases acerbic wit in teary three-four time, setting the scene for “Two Broken Hearts” – a wounded lovers’ getaway story with an open ending. Over the course of these thirteen songs it becomes increasingly apparent why his clever intertwining of country tropes and crisp modernism has so impressed country music fans, critics and songwriters alike. (Alt-country pioneer Ryan Adams just recently praised Outlaw, calling his work “beyond great songwriting”.)

Angeleno’s critical acclaim also led to 18 months of international touring. He entertained thousands of festival-goers with a prime slot at Stagecoach, made four trips to Europe, toured Australia twice and played several hundred gigs in the USA. After all those miles it’s fitting that Tenderheart bottles the energy of the songs that have become mainstays of his live show. Fan-favorites like “Diamond Ring” and honky-tonk sing-along “All My Life” finally get proper studio treatment, along with “Look At You Now,” a regular highlight of his acoustic tours overseas – where Outlaw is nominated for AmericanaUK’s International Album of the Year alongside Sturgill Simpson and Margo Price.

Not one to mess with a winning combination, Sam called on many of the same musicians that made Angeleno such a success: harmony singer Molly Jenson, pedal steel pro Jeremy Long and guitarist Danny Garcia, along with Taylor Goldsmith (Dawes) and Bo Koster (My Morning Jacket). Produced by Martin Pradler and Outlaw and recorded in the San Fernando Valley, Tenderheart also features Erwin Vasquez and Mariachi Teocuitatlan, a local mariachi group who appeared in the video for Angeleno’s title track.

Now two years into his new life, Outlaw has learned that great dreams can only be achieved at great cost. And at its core, Tenderheart is the outcome of another lesson learned: if your heart stays true, the sacrifice is worth it.

'Angeleno made him a legitimate contender to be the biggest country star L.A. has produced since Dwight Yoakam.'
LA Weekly

'Sam Outlaw is rewriting the sound of Country, 2,000 miles from Nashville'
CBS This Morning

'An instant classic'
NPR Music

'[Outlaw is] leading the rebirth of L.A.’s modern country scene.'
Rolling Stone Country


 Tickets for this show are £12.50 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from the venue or Jumbo Records in person or online from here.

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Micah P Hinson
& The Holy Strangers
The Crescent, York
Sunday 24th September, 7.30pm

 Website / Watch / Listen

Micah P. Hinson’s new album “Presents The Holy Strangers” is described by the artist as being a “modern folk opera.” Telling the story of a war time family, going from birth to love, to marriage and children, to war and betrayal, murder to suicide – spanning all of the strange and glorious places life can lead. We follow their story, we see their decisions, we see their faults and their beauty. We live with them, we die with them.

Two years in the making, Micah wrote and recorded The Holy Strangers in Denison, Texas, incorporating ancient reel to reels, analogue keyboards, old Tascam and Yamaha desks. The recording only entered the digital realm once pre-mastering took place.

Split across two pieces of the vinyl, the 14 tracks which make up The Holy Strangers are at times sparse and haunting; at other times luscious, maybe even euphoric. From the Johnny Cash-style country single “Lover’s Lane,” to the album’s broad, spoken-word centrepiece “Micah Book One”,

The Holy Strangers covers a lot of ground over the course of its hour long running time, appealing to both long-time fans and new ones alike.

Micah P. Hinson Presents The Holy Strangers is released 8th September 2017 on Full Time Hobby. Micah will be touring Europe throughout September and October with a full band.


Tickets for these shows are £15 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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 Acid Mothers Temple
& The Melting Paraiso UFO
The Crescent, York
Tuesday 24th October, 7.30pm

 The legendary Japanese psychedelic rock five piece led by Kawabata Makoto return to York in October.

Website / Watch / Listen
 

In 1995 the quartet of Kawabata Makoto (Musica Transonic, Mainliner, Toho Sara), Koizumi Hajime (ex. Mainliner, ex. Seventh Seal), Suhara Keizo (Arijigoku, Rashinban), and Cotton Casino (Mady Gura Blue Heaven) formed a new group and started to record their improvised jam sessions.

A group of social dropouts of every description – musicians, dancers, artists, farmers, channellers, ex-yakuza, mermaid researchers and professional vagrants – known as the Acid Mothers Temple Soul Collective, had already begun to coalesce around Kawabata. Then Higashi Hiroshi (ex.Yumejin) joined.

In January 1996, some local residents got the wrong end of the stick and assumed that their house was a hideout for members of the Aum Shinrikyo cult that had committed the gas attack on the Tokyo subway. In the end, they were forced to move out of the original Acid Mothers Temple Soul Collective house and their group began to transform from a hippie commune into a true collective of souls. “Acid Mother’s Temple & The Melting Paraiso U.F.O.” was released on cassette tape by Acid Mother’s Temple label.

The group released their self-titled debut album on PSF Records (Japan) in November 1997. The album was selected as one of the 50 best albums of the year by the British music magazine, The Wire. Since then Acid Mothers Temple have toured the world over, performing and recording in many guises, reaching every possible audience. They've released literally hundreds of singles, albums and CD-Rs and played every psychedelic happening worth it's salt worldwide.


Tickets for these shows are £10 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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The Dream Syndicate
Brudenell Social Club, Leeds
Wednesday 1st November, 7.30pm


With a brand new album ready to go for Tom Waits Anti- Records, The Dream Syndicate have finally decided to extend their reformation to the UK. They will play two shows in London and this one in Leeds. Steve Wynn, Mark Walton, Dennis Duck and The Miracle 3's Jason Victor. We've been in Steve's ear for years and needless to say we're absolutely delighted to be hosting.

Website / Watch / Listen

Full beautiful story:

At one point during the making of our new record I said to my bandmates, "hey, you only get the chance to make a first Dream Syndicate album in 30 years once in your life." It's a strange statement but one that's hard to refute (unless we end up making one at some point in our late 80's--which, well, you never know).
But that was the attitude we brought to the project. Either the record was going to be great, everything we hoped it would be, or we would just shelve and write it off, both financially and publicly, as a bold experiment that didn't work out.

We felt the odds were in our favor. The 50+ shows we'd played since we reunited back in 2012 had been among the best the band ever played, the perfect mix of agile improvisation, wild abandon and rock solid grooves that had always been the band's hallmark. The only 21st century addition to the band, guitarist Jason Victor who had played with me for years as a member of my solo backing band the Miracle 3, silenced any doubters within minutes of every show. He was the perfect and undisputed heir to the Syndicate axe-slingers who had come before--raw, mercurial, knowing and skilled.

And I wrote a bunch of songs to take down to Montrose Studios in Richmond, Virginia, a place I had worked often in recent years and felt was the perfect immersive retreat where we could conduct our laboratory of past, present and future. It's the kind of studio where you can grab a guitar, sandwich, cup of coffee or beer from your temporary home and stroll just a handful of steps to the studio, ready to work at almost any hour of the day. The Dream Syndicate, after all, was never really about a ticking clock, never a slave to time or space.

The magic? It was there. It was there with almost as much ease and grace as the first rehearsal we had three years before in Madrid despite Mark Walton, Dennis Duck and I having not played together for several decades. In a little less than a week we recorded much more than we needed, guided as co-producer and joined on keyboards by our old pal Chris Cacavas (who was on hand as full-time chef as well--love that guy!)

It was obvious that this would become a record, would not be tucked away as a curio to ooze out over the decades as a bootleg or maybe even forgotten. This was for real. This was going to be the fifth album by the Dream Syndicate, albeit with a long gap since the fourth.

What was started in Richmond, ably recorded by Adrian Olsen (with assistant from his dad, Montrose Studio founder Bruce Olsen) was moved back north to be mixed at Water Music in Hoboken, New Jersey by the legendary John Agnello, who has produced, engineered and/or mixed six of my previous albums. He was the perfect choice, a kindred soul in history, savvy, humor and boundless enthusiasm. The cherry on top was the peerless mastering skills of Greg Calbi, another legend and another regular collaborator of mine.

Oh, and there was one last surprise, one more perfect link to our past and completing of the circle. One of the more intriguing of the songs we recorded was a hypnotic trance and mantra called "Recurring." I had a pretty decent lyric and sang a good vocal but somehow it just didn't work. The song and riff was cool, the band's recording was evocative and beautiful. But I began to realize I wasn't the right singer for the song. And I knew immediately that the perfect singer would be the only other person to sing lead on a Dream Syndicate song, our original bass player Kendra Smith. I was amazed and delighted that my old friend and bandmate agreed to do it and then wrote some astounding lyrics and sang a vocal that at once as true to the spirit of the song and also turned the whole thing upside down. The song, now called "Kendra's Dream" is the perfect coda to the record, tying up loose ends from the past and then opening them up again to the future.

The past. The present. The future. I always felt that the Dream Syndicate was largely about receiving, carrying and then passing along a torch of the bands that we loved passionately but whom didn't necessarily get the love and attention they deserved, living in the shadows as cult favorites, secret passwords into a society of musical fanaticism and time-delayed impact on generations to come. When we made The Days of Wine and Roses, we were obsessed with bands like the Velvet Underground, the Fall, the Gun Club, Neu, the Stooges, Big Star, the Modern Lovers--bands who are much more well-known now but were almost invisible at the time. Over the course of our lifetime as a band we felt a kinship with other bands in our various scenes around the US (you can take your own guess, you'll probably be right) and in the years since we disbanded in 1988, I've heard bits of our sound in many bands that followed. It's how these things work and it's beautiful.

And that's one of the many things I love about this new record. It feels like the perfect mix of everything we loved and everything that followed in the wake of what we did and what we loved. It sounds like everything that I loved about the Dream Syndicate and yet sounds unlike any other record we made. It's what we did but it's also what we do. Dennis, Mark, Jason, Chris and I set the bar high. It's the way it had to be. And you know what? We cleared that bar with room to spare. And that's why it's a finished record and will be available to listen by more people than just ourselves. We couldn't be happier.


Tickets for this show are £17.50 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from Crash Records and Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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Daniel Romano
Brudenell Social Club, Leeds

Sunday 12th November, 7.30pm

Prolific singer/songwriter and Rock ‘n' Roll chameleon Daniel Romano will release his seventh solo album Modern Pressure next Friday, May 19, via New West Records. In celebration of the record’s release, Romano will embark on a U.S. tour that includes shows in Boston, Washington DC, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Nashville, and Chicago before heading to Europe to finish the job.

Noisey previously announced Modern Pressure’s release and premiered the video for album track "Roya" calling it “a dreamy, laid back head-nodder featuring shuffling shakers, jangly tambourine, and ever-present, slinking guitar lines.” Of the 12-song set, they praise, “It's sonically spiritual to 2016's Mosey, and shows Romano continuing to sharpen his signature sound, combining elements of retro-tinged rock 'n' roll, country, and psychedelia to create a vibrant tapestry of tunes that feel just as at home in 2017 as they might in 1965.”

Propelled and resourceful as he is prolific, Romano recorded Modern Pressure at a minimalistic cabin in secluded Finnsäs, Sweden with additional string and horn players being added at Baldwin Street Sound in Toronto, ON. Engineered by long-time collaborator Kenneth Meehan, the fevered pace of work lent itself to the unrestrained and undeviated nature of the songs themselves. Songs that were written in observational scrutiny beneath the overcast atmosphere of 2016 and vigorously tackle the present-day heaviness we contain in the jotting bones of our guilty expressions. The twelve tracks boldly ask, “What age is this? What blooming weight do we carry?”


Website / Watch / Watch / Watch

Daniel Romano took the stage for the first time in 1993 as the eight-year-old drummer for his family’s rhythm and blues band. He has since released six solo albums, on which he is the sole performer of all instruments, and launched a pioneering punk rock project called Ancient Shapes that Canadian metal blog Hellbound asserts is “an outstanding new work in its own right.” Romano has simultaneously acted as a producer, engineer, artist, composer, arranger, and videographer. Over the past decade, he has gained three Polaris Music Prize nominations and three Juno nominations, as well as been awarded two platinum albums and Juno Awards for his performance, production, and arrangement work with artist City and Colour.

His 2015 New West Records debut If I’ve Only One Time Askin’ garnered rave reviews from NPR’s Fresh Air, Rolling Stone Country, Mojo, Uncut, Boston Globe, and Exclaim!; and it set the stage for the release of Mosey, which Pitchfork praised as “songs that look to the great beyond” and The Line of Best Fit named one of "The Fifty Best Deep Cuts of 2016.” The album features actress Rachel McAdams on standout track “Toulouse.” McAdams is one of many impressive collaborators whom Romano has worked with throughout his career, including The Tragically Hip’s Gord Downie, legendary Canadian singer-songwriter Ron Sexsmith, and trailblazing bands The Constantines and The Sadies.

'Mosey is clearly not just the work of an absurdly gifted musician, it's the product of an exceptionally vibrant mind.'
**** Uncut Magazine

'This is ain't your average country record.'
**** The Line Of Best Fit

'Mosey is highly approachable and magnetic without being mawkish, but it also speaks clearly to Romano's various frustrations with his generation. These 12 tunes are as poetic as they are powerful, and house a hefty amount of meaning.'
**** Exclaim!


Tickets for this show are £12 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from Crash Records and Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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An Evening With The Seeger MacColl Family featuring Peggy Seeger, Neill MacColl & Calum MacColl

The Crescent, York
Monday 27th November, 7.30pm

The Seeger MacColl family are one of folk music’s most loved dynasties. Singer, songwriter and feminist icon Peggy Seeger performs with Neill and Calum, her sons with Ewan MacColl. Join these three exceptional musicians for a gloriously relaxed evening of great music and witty family banter. Expect to hear songs of love, politics and storytelling, including some from Peggy’s award-winning latest album alongside Ewan MacColl’s best loved songs. This is an intimate evening with a remarkable family that will linger long in the memory.

“Peggy may be folk royalty, but there’s nothing either reverent or nostalgic about this joyous performance”
The Guardian

“A memorable warm and charming evening of great music,
family humour and grace.”
Irish World

“Glorious”
The Times

“An effortlessly intimate affair”
The Scotsman


Tickets for these shows are £18 in advance.
 
You can get tickets in person from The Inkwell in York, Jumbo Records in Leeds or online from here.

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